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hyper orb puzzle

Description: HyperOrb Puzzle is an arcade style game inspired heavily by the classic Atari game Marble Madness. Features include completely script driven levels with dynamic geometry, real-time lighting, and an accurate physics engine.

This download contains the first complete alpha build of the game containing one playable level.

Requires: DirectX 8+ and 3D Card

Download: Win32

Controls:

    Movement: Arrow keys (up,down,left,right)
    Speed boost: Spacebar
    Camera: I,J,K,L


The Story Behind the Game

HyperOrb Puzzle was a concept Erland Injerd and I began thinking about during the spring semester of 2001. We had decided early when we had first started college that we wanted to take the time we would have during our education to showcase our abilities in game design and programming. Both of us were fascinated by game design and were looking forward to make games in our free time and perhaps even professionally after completing our degrees.

This game is the product of a two year effort on our part. We had to juggle classes and jobs while we spent our free time bringing this game to life. This project marked several new aspects of game programming we had never explored before. While both of us had created smaller games in the past, HyperOrb was going to be a much larger project than either of us had worked on before. This game was going to be 3 dimensional and both of us had grown up playing games that were largely 2d and, at the time, neither one of us had had the opportunity to take a Linear Algebra class or work with vector math.

We had many ideas about what kind of game to make and this idea was chosen specifically for simplicity. Previous experience with software projects made us cautious of trying to make anything too complicated. Marble Madness was a game that stood out in my mind as simple in concept, but easily improved upon. This gave us a firm set of requirements to base our plans on and allowed us to improvise if we had extra time.

Unfortunately, we were unable to include all the features we had hoped due to time constraints. The graphics engine was my first attempt so many graphical artifacts are present along with less than optimal performance. The graphics included were done entirely by me, except for the skybox by Damian Hoover, and since neither Erland or I were stellar artists we hoped to get a better artist to make the final graphics for the game. Our plans for the future also included an easy to use level editor and network support for multiplayer games. Given the opportunity, we are still planing on completing this game and making it available to the public.

We were able to use this game for our Software Engineering project as part of our Computer Science degree. Charles Wesley was a huge help, becoming our Project Manager for a semester helping Erland and I make time for programming by shaping the notes and design outlines we had previously written into documents that fulfilled the requirements of the class.



all content, graphics, and programs/code, unless otherwise noted, are copyright 2004 chris wilson
all programs and code are pre-alpha quality and have no warranty